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Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

3 edition of Wild, edible, and poisonous plants of Alaska. found in the catalog.

Wild, edible, and poisonous plants of Alaska.

Christine A. Heller

Wild, edible, and poisonous plants of Alaska.

by Christine A. Heller

  • 117 Want to read
  • 14 Currently reading

Published by Cooperative Extension Service, University of Alaska in [Anchorage] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Alaska.
    • Subjects:
    • Wild plants, Edible -- Alaska.,
    • Poisonous plants -- Alaska.

    • Edition Notes

      SeriesPublication / Cooperative Extension Service, University of Alaska ;, no. 28, Publication (University of Alaska (System). Cooperative Extension Service) ;, no. 28.
      ContributionsUniversity of Alaska (System). Cooperative Extension Service.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQK98.5.U6 H44 1974
      The Physical Object
      Pagination88 p. :
      Number of Pages88
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5018405M
      LC Control Number76622152

      This is a very serviceable book concerning foraging for wild, edible plants in the US and Canada. The aspects that drew me to this book were the multiple processing options for the edible plants. The text breaks down how to locate, identify, harvest and then eat the various species, including which ones are best made into jam, eaten raw or /5. There are hundreds of edible plants in Alaska, unfortunately there are also a number of plants with potentially harmful effects. In the event that you do become lost in the Alaskan wilderness, it’s helpful to know some of the key poisonous plants to look out for.

      Benefits of Edible Wild Plants. One of the reasons so many people love wild edible plants is that they're free! As well, the nutrition content is higher in wild edible plants than store bought foods because they are wild and you're gathering them fresh and in store bought food is sitting on the shelves for a long time before you get to it and you don't get to see your food in its Missing: Alaska.   Edible (and Poisonous) Plants of Southeast Alaska Foraging For Edible Plants In Alaska (wild and edible) - Duration:

      Wild Edible and Poisonous Plants of Alaska. Fairbanks, AK: Cooperative Extension Service. Contains descriptions, but limited to edible and poisonous plants. $1; Heller, Christine. (). Wild Flowers of Alaska. Anchorage, AK: Heller Enterprises. Has color pictures but lacks descriptions of plants. _ is a warning for possible poisonous or rash-producing plants or parts of plants. Wild Edibles of Missouri may seem to be a contradiction on the conservation of plants. While most sources suggest that plants be protected from destruction, this book advocates that the plant be g: Alaska.


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Wild, edible, and poisonous plants of Alaska by Christine A. Heller Download PDF EPUB FB2

Wild Edible and Poisonous Plants of Alaska. Paperback – January 1, by Cooperative Extension Service (Author) out of 5 stars 2 ratings. See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Used from /5(2). Wild Edible and Poisonous Plants of Alaska Revised Edition by Christine Heller (Author) out of 5 stars 1 rating.

ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important. ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. 3/5(1). Wild, edible and poisonous plants in Alaska: Cooperative extension work in Agriculture and Home Economics Extension Service, University of Alaska, and U.S.

Dept. of Agriculture, cooperating [Christine A Heller] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Wild, edible and poisonous plants in Alaska: Cooperative extension work in Agriculture and Home Economics Extension Service, University of Alaska, and cooperating (University of Alaska) Paperback – by : DR.

CHRISTINE A. HELLER. Get this from a library. Wild, edible, and poisonous plants of Alaska. [Christine A Heller; University of Alaska (System). Cooperative Extension Service.]. Good condition in stapled wrappers (soft cover). Covers lightly worn, owner's name stamped on title page and page edges.

Otherwise clean, tight, no tears or creases, no markings to pages. Edible leaves, fruits, roots and underground stems, new shoots or inner bark, seaweeds. Discovering Wild Plants: Alaska, Western Canada, The Northwest Paperback – June 1, by Janice Schofield Eaton (Author)/5(31).

Rules for Gathering Wild Plants. The rules I follow and recommend to one and all are: BE SMART: Some plants have inedible or poisonous look-alikes. Be sure you know what you’ve harvested before eating any wild plant. Follow the wise adage: “When in doubt, throw it out!” There are many excellent field guides to edible plants.

In Alaska we can tons of edible and delicious plant life, but there are a number of plants with potentially harmful effects too.

It is essential for any outdoor adventurer to be aware of their presence and prepare a plan in the case of emergency. Many poisonous plants can strongly resemble an edible plant. Harvesting Alaska, baneberry, deadly alaskan plants, delphinium, false hellebore, hiking, monkshood, poison/water hemlock, Poisonous, poisonous plants, white camass, Wild Calla Permalink 2 thoughts on “Poisonous Plants of Alaska: What you need to know.”.

Wild Edible and Poisonous Plants of Alaska: Christine Heller: Books - or: Christine Heller. Get this from a library. Wild, edible, and poisonous plants of Alaska.

[Christine A Heller; University of Alaska (College). Cooperative Extension Service in Agriculture and Home Economics.]. OCLC Number: Notes: Cover title. Written by Christine A. Heller; illustrated by Marion R. Sheehan and Claudia Kelsey. Revised edition of: Edible and poisonous plants of Alaska.

An authoritative guide book to more than 70 of Alaska's most common wild edible plants. Tuck this guide into a backpack, glove compartment, or pocket and use its color photographs and habitat and plant descriptions to help you discover the bounty of the land and its plants around : Graphic Arts Center Publishing Company.

Cover title: Wild edible and poisonous plants of Alaska. Description: pages illustrations 28 cm: Other Titles: Wild edible and poisonous plants of Alaska: Responsibility: Illus. by Marion R. Sheehan and Claudia Kelsey. Learn about and harvest wild plants, and eat a picnic creekside.

Return to the homestead to review uses of plants, make medicinal preparations, and include any plants harvested in the evening meal. Dinner around the campfire. June After breakfast, prepare to explore medicinal plants of meadows and woodland. Hike into the boreal forest, with. In general, you should stay away from green, yellow and white berries, while 90 percent of purple, blue and black berries are edible [source: Davenport ].

Keep an eye out for poisonous baneberries in Alaska. According to the Alaska Department of Parks and Recreation, these berries grow in shady woods and may be red or white.

Southeast Alaska has an unusual climate that allows a large number of edible plant and edible mushroom species to grow. The area consists primarily of the Tongass National Forest, which is a Temperate rainforest has plenty of precipitation and the temperature remains relatively constant, therefore many plant and fungi species flourish there.

How Chris McCandless Died. By Jon Krakaue r. in both the scientific literature and in popular books about edible plants, new evidence that the wild-potato plant is highly toxic in and of. Berry hunters will treasure this book for identifying the flowers and berries of edible and poisonous berry plants.

Color photographs of each plant accompany a brief description, and a map of Alaska is included with each to show where the plants may be found geographically. Poisonous plants Pages:.

An authoritative guide book to more than 70 of Alaska's most common wild edible plants. Tuck this guide into a backpack, glove compartment, or pocket and use its color photographs and habitat and plant descriptions to help you discover the bounty of the land and its plants around you/5.Identifying Edible and Poisonous Wild Plants.

Our Hedgerow Guide aims to help you forage for British plants that are relatively common in the wild, easy to find and good to eat – and to avoid those that are inedible or poisonous.

Never rely on one source for plant identification, and never eat anything unless you are % sure it is g: Alaska.Edible and Medicinal Plants of the West is a beautiful, practical book by respected herbalist and naturalist, Gregory Tilford. Despite the reference to the “West” in the title of this book, the author notes that the many of the plants described in the book can be found throughout much of the United States—from the Midwest and Southeast and from the west coast of Canada to southern Alaska.